What to Consider Before Leasing a Car

 

Some people choose to lease a car rather than buying one outright. Here are some useful tips on what to consider before leasing a car:

The most important thing to remember is that you do not own the vehicle. You get to use it but must return it at the end of the lease unless you choose to buy it.

Monthly lease payments are usually lower than monthly loan payments because you are paying only for the vehicle's depreciation during the lease term, plus rent charges (like interest), taxes and fees.

You are responsible for any early termination charges if you end the lease early.

You may return the vehicle at lease-end, pay any end-of-lease costs and "walk away."

The lessor has the risk of the future market value of the vehicle.

Most leases limit the number of miles you may drive (often 12,000-15,000 per year). You can negotiate a higher mileage limit and pay a higher monthly payment. You will likely have to pay charges for exceeding those limits if you return the vehicle.

Most leases limit wear to the vehicle during the lease term. You will likely have to pay extra charges for exceeding those limits if you return the vehicle.

At the end of the lease (typically 2-4 years), you may have a new payment either to finance the purchase of the existing vehicle or to lease another vehicle.

At the beginning of the lease, you may have to pay your first monthly payment; a refundable security deposit or your last monthly payment; other fees for licenses, registration, and title; a capitalized cost reduction; an acquisition fee; freight or destination charges and any applicable local taxes.

At the end of the lease , if you don't buy the vehicle, you may have to pay a disposition fee and charges for excess miles and excessive wear.

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